Monthly Archives: May 2011

a return from the Northwest

From my home in Oregon to my home in the Netherlands. I’m back in Amsterdam after a trip to the Northwest for a wedding, reunion, and time with family and friends. Photos to come, but for now I’ll leave you with several items celebrating my favorite state (above necklace by truche).

Put a bird on it pillow by lovecalifornia

Oregon poster by aruppel, a personal favorite

Weekend Links #27

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed last week:
1. Reading the bits of wisdom gathered in The Good Advice Project by designer Jacob Lysgaard and photographer Hanne Hvattum (pictured above, via The Post Family)
2. Partaking in the combination of a song, lyrics, a photograph, and musings on Icarus & Occident (pictured below Leo Berne‘s photo paired with Bon Iver’s Calgary, via show&tell)
3. Viewing the 0 to 100 project app, a study of life and aging through the portraits of 101 people (via heodeza)
4. Listening to Death Cab for Cutie’s new album Code and Keys on NPR’s first listen

books from winter and spring

The months since January have been filled with work projects, making the moments I could escape into a book even more of a pleasure. Here, an overview of the books I have read over the past five months, with the addition of two from my recent holiday:

Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. An escaped convict flees Australia for India to start a new life. Adventure ensues as he enters a life of crime and philanthropy in Bombay, while providing insight into the penal system he fled.

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff. Actually a book for young adults, a quick read about 15-year-old Daisy who departs from New York to visit her cousins in England. War breaks out, the adults disappear and the children must learn to survive on their own.

Travels in Siberia by Ian Frazier. A non-fiction account weaving together the stories of past travelers to Siberia and Frazier’s own experience exploring the vast region and its history.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. A young girl from a poor family and her stories of growing up in Brooklyn. Just beautiful.

The Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova. A psychologist explores the secrets that keep a patient, renowned artist Robert Oliver, in a vow of silence. His search leads him into an exploration of the lives behind French Impressionism. An interesting read, but not as captivating as Kostova’s The Historian.

Sarah’s Key by Tatiana De Rosnay. Journalist Julie Jarmond’s investigation into Vel d’Hivs, a round up of Jews in Paris, unveils unexpected links to her own life. I fail to see how this could be a New York Times bestseller.

Before Green Gables by Budge Wilson. A novel inspired by Lucy M Montgomery’s tales of Anne Shirley, which imagines the years of childhood that formed the girl who first appeared in Anne of Green Gables. Lovely, full of imagination, and exactly the Anne I expected.

out of sight

The last month has found me in the midst of a major content production period at work and the heat is on until the moment I board a plane to Seattle tomorrow.

For those who don’t know, my job involves creating and publishing online content related to photojournalism. The last weeks have been filled with interviews, editorial work, website updates, multimedia productions, and an abundance of photography and photographers. It’s an exciting time, but has required all my focus – the reason why things have been a bit quiet around small sight.

So, it’s time for an update. On Saturday, we launched an iPad app. A colleague and I have spent a few months together working on the photo app with a team of developers and I was thrilled when it went out into the world. Last weekend marked the annual Awards Days where photographers from around the world gather in Amsterdam. This year there was a lot of talk around our new multimedia contest and the announcement of winners. In between moments of watching photographers present their work and screening multimedia productions, I was heading up the production team that interviewed 20 photographers about their work. In between all that, I sat down with Nancy Donaldson, a multimedia producer at The New York Times, to talk about multimedia. Interview coming soon.

The real work has centered around the new website that we hoped would go online about now. A number of development delays have come up, but it does deserve a post of its own. For now, I am off across the ocean in the morning, but I will leave you with a recommendation to enjoy the stories of the photographers and view these impressive multimedia productions.

(photo via).

Weekend Links #26

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed last week:
1. Spotting a literary map of the United States after creating a summer reading list with my sister comprised solely of modern American literature (pictured above)
2. Finding these lovely skirts and trying to decide which color(s) I most prefer
3. Browsing the program of the upcoming Holland Festival and booking tickets for a performance of The Sun Also Rises
4. Watching a unique musical performance in the forests of Japan (video and photo below, via Tom)