Monthly Archives: October 2011

happy halloween

A barrel of pumpkins spotted in Copenhagen. My Halloween will involve a Skype conversation to see the costumes of my nieces before I head into an evening lecture by photographer Christopher Anderson. Not much for a celebration, but I will use the day as an excuse to eat some candy. Enjoy your Halloween!

weekend links #42

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed over the last week:
1. Listening to the new album by Tom Waits on NPR
2. Entering a giveaway for a bicycle calendar by Lisa Rupp (pictured above, via unruly things)
3. Learning about the history and variations of the ampersand
4. Watching a video of the making of a fantastic magazine cover by Paperlux (pictured below, via curiosity counts)


late October harvest

A Saturday morning delivery from de krat. With a busy work week ahead, I am looking forward to eating well with parsnip fries, baked apples, a romanesco pasta, and a pumpkin soup. The crate also came with a bottle of vlierbes azijn (elderberry vinegar), pictured below.

While Marcus is much more experimental when it comes to cooking, I have been expanding my collection of recipes with inspiration from these food blogs: 101 cookbooks, roost, what katie ate, bella eats, spoon fork bacon, sweet paul, and my new roots. What are some of your favorite places to find new food inspiration?

a plan for a day

When I announced my engagement on small sight, I knew I wouldn’t turn this space into a wedding blog, but I also want to share a few moments along the way. Planning an intercultural wedding and marriage leaves a lot of room for learning. I spent one morning in September running between the American and German consulates in Amsterdam to finally learn that all answers would depend on the German province in which we will wed.

After phone calls, clarifications, translations, and waiting rooms, Marcus and I now have all our paperwork in order! It now needs to be submitted for approval, after which we will be allowed to schedule an appointment at the registry office in Berlin. What I thought would be the most difficult part has actually been quite painless.

I wish I had better news for the yet-to-be-printed save the date cards and the yet-to-be-booked venue. My older sister has a lot of event planning experience and is encouraging us to finalize the most critical parts. Maybe it’s because we’re planning a Berlin wedding while being in Amsterdam, but everything is just taking a lot more time. In between, I have been gathering some visual inspiration for that day in April, which I wanted to share. If anyone has some tips on wedding planning, I would love some insight! How did you handle all the details and planning?

Photo sources: flowers, table, dress and bouquet, church.

Weekend Links #41

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed over the last week:
1. Partaking in the autumn harvest with roasted parsnips (pictured above)
2. Starting to plan the next trip (someday) to Copenhagen a restaurant tips
3. Voting in Time Out‘s Best of Amsterdam 2011 list and getting new tips
4. Reading the familiar stories of the families in The Mixed Race Project (via allison lehman)
5. Watching the trailer for Pina, a 3-D dance film about the work of choreographer Pina Bausch, by Wim Wenders (embedded below)

delicious autumn

Looking forward to a sunny autumn weekend and brunch for three.

Image via seasonal love.

autumn cycling

Cycling is not simply a summer affair in Amsterdam. Yet when I see a week of rain ahead on the weather forecast, it takes extra motivation to hop on my two wheels in the morning. Having my rain gear ready (and always with me) makes it easier to bear a drizzle or downpour. My kit includes rain pants, a waterproof jacket, a hat with a brim to keep the water out of my eyes, and always leather or rubber shoes. Suffering through a spot of rain is worth the freedom and pleasure that comes with riding. Here, are a few tips for gear that make cycling in the autumn a breeze.

Above photo via Amsterdamize.

Rain cape by Iva Jean.

Rain booties from Loeffler Randall and a rain hat from Ridlington.

Rainboots, made cuter with Kove leg warmers (via unruly things)

fluena

A lovely font by German designer Maria Fischer, the creator behind Traumgedanken. Soft and flowing.

in Copenhagen

A short trip north to Copenhagen last week took me to Denmark for my first time. One day for work, then another day for pleasure. On Thursday, meetings and a business dinner gave me a chance to see the neighborhoods of Frederieksberg and Vesterbro. On Friday, I headed towards Nyhavn and the row of colorful houses on the water. Here, a few sights along the route.

A walk up the Rundetaarn (round tower) led to a view over the city.

‘In the house that stood here until 1908 lived Søren Kierkegaard, from his birth on 5 May 1813 until 27 April 1848.’

The statue of Absalon.

Agnete and the Merman, an underwater sculpture.

Pumpkins in a row.

Please note the beautifully carved seat and handlebars.

City trips often make me compare the city I am visiting with other cities I know. Copenhagen is often described as similar to Amsterdam and in many ways that comparison holds true. Bicycles, water, flat land, Northern, and cold weather. Yet the differences, which were many, caught my interest. Two days was just enough to catch a scent of Denmark.

action

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquility: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it.

Jane Eyre, chapter xii

Weekend Links #40

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed over the last week:
1. Falling in love with the Danish kitchen at Kødbyens Fiskebar, especially the dessert of sea buckthorn sorbet with licorice, hip rose, and baked rice pudding (photo by Adrian Joachim via)
2. Reading an interview with Nick Hand, author of Conversations on the Coast, a collection of stories and images of artisans he met during a 5,000-mile journey along the British coastline
3. Being inspired to try out new ways to wear a scarf (via Ez)
4. Gathering recipes for another Thanksgiving in Amsterdam (pumpkin mousse pictured below)

Antalya

Antalya. The final stop in our trip through Turkey. We left Kekova in the jeep, winding our way north along the coast, then through the pine forests, and finally arriving in Antalya where three-lane roads become six-lane roads. Marcus did a heroic job driving.

That afternoon we befriended a bookstore owner who kept his books in dusty, teetering piles and asked “What are you reading?” instead of “How are you doing?” He was pleased with the answers that Marcus and I provided and we were invited to sit and share fresh watermelon and figs as he told us what to do and see in the Old City neighborhood.

We spent the rest of the day wandering the cobbled streets to find Hadrian’s Gate and Kesik Minare (the broken minaret) and enjoyed a fantastic evening meal at Vanilla. The next day, we didn’t have to go to the airport until 19.00 so we started walking around the neighborhood and then to the park. As we came upon the rocky shoreline, we realized that the only thing we wanted to do on our last day was swim. We returned to the hotel, unpacked our swimsuits, snorkeling gear, towels, and books and returned to a restaurant perched precariously on the rocks with a small ladder down to the water. We swam and read and slept in the sun until the moment came to pick our backpacks and head to the airport.

A view of the Kesik Minare from the hotel.

Access to the waters.

Hadrian’s Gate.

Weekend Links #39

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed over the last week:
1. Spotting a photo of this beautiful work of street art by Remed (via unurth)
2. Buying tickets to see First Aid Kit on 8 December in Amsterdam
3. Planning a short jaunt over to Copenhagen next week
4. Seeing an infographic which visualizes American ancestry, which is largely German (via curiosity counts)
5. Watching Ed van der Elsken’s short films of Amsterdam in the ’80s (via @Ellenbokkinga)

Üçağız and Kekova

Üçağız, the gateway to Kekova, is a small fishing village of about 400 residents. Tourist boats from nearby Kaş passed in the distance to see the sunken city of Simena, but this Hemingway-esque retreat was full of peace. Pictured above, the pier of our pension out to the water.

Across the peninsula and over a hill strewn with sarcophagi, was Kekova and a small collection of houses, restaurants, and pensions that sat across the water from the sunken ruins.

A fisherman returning to the harbor.

Three boats in the bay.

In Üçağız, Marcus and I discovered gözleme, a Turkish style crêpe, filled with cheese, onions, and potato. The elderly couple who owned the small restaurant were so friendly and we ate there multiple times. Marcus befriended the  man and spoke about politics in a strange mix of Turkish, German, and English. His wife was full of smiles for me and serious remarks towards her husband’s political comments. In addition to delicious gözleme and Ayran (a Turkish yoghurt drink), they would bring out watermelon, pears, or apples for dessert and sit down with us and share the fruit.

Visiting the sunken city was only possible with a group, either on a boat or by kayak. Marcus and I chose to paddle across the bay on a four-hour tour for an up-close view. The sunken city is a collection of ancient Lycian ruins, destroyed by earthquake, attacks over the centuries, and time. We would have loved to spend more time there, but swimming and snorkeling is prohibited. So we looked, admired, and then paddled to Kekova for lunch.

Kekova is only accessible by boat. Or by foot if you’re willing to make the sweaty hike over the hilly peninsula, through the necropolis, and past the grazing goats. As we did on the second day there.

The hike was tiring, but we rewarded ourselves with homemade ice cream from one of the pensions in Kekova, then hiked further towards a secluded bay to swim and snorkel.

When we arrived in Üçağız, we realized that they didn’t have any cash machines and had to go to a bank in the nearby town of Demre for extra lira. The landscape was again astounding. On our return trip, we picked up a hitch-hiking granny who ended up being the cousin of the man at whose pension we were staying. Marcus was mysteriously able to hold a conversation with her and we were laughing as we bounced across the dusty road, the woman waving to all her friends as we passed.

a ride in Het Twiske

A Saturday bike ride north of Amsterdam, discovering Het Twiske. Five hours of sun, with wheels turning and eyes cast upon the Dutch landscape. Wooden bridges carried us across the waters and people wished us a good day as we cycled past.

recipes for October

This week’s delivery brought eggs, bread, broccoli stalks, pears, red onions, apple pear juice, radishes, chard, Savoy cabbage, purslane, and beef. After hearing about three more acquaintances who have signed up for de krat, I decided to not only write about the week’s content, but also share a few recipes.

Pears. In the latest edition of Sweet Paul magazine, there is a section dedicated to pear recipes. The desserts look fantastic, of course, but I decided to test out the pear soup. Perfect for fall.

Fall greens. Last week we received a bunch of kale, something I have never cooked with before. I tried a simple recipe, sauteéing the greens with olive oil and garlic, then topping with a bit of cheese.

What are some of your favorite autumn recipes?