Tag Archives: writing

six word story every day

Six Word Story Every Day is ‘a daily storytelling exploration through language and typography’ by a collaboration of artists and designers. When I first saw the concept, it reminded me of Hint Fiction, with a design component. I was delighted to read in the About section that the inspiration was indeed the story which Ernest Hemingway regarded as his best: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” The hint fiction genre was inspired by this story, challenging writers to compile a story in 25 words or less.

The stories compiled in SWSED utilize only six words, with plenty of support from visual elements. One of the requirements of hint fiction is that the story is complete in itself. It should ignite the imagination, but need no further explanation. Although many of the stories in SWSED are more of a phrase or slogan (‘Say something that is worth saying’), the level of creativity makes it a joy to browse through the entries.

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Weekend Links #21

Well, it’s Thursday, not quite the weekend anymore, but I wanted to send out the weekend links I put together for my faithful readers. New and exciting projects at work have scrambled my familiar schedule and I’m still figuring out how to stay on top of my personal projects. Hope those of you in the northern hemisphere are also enjoying the first signs of spring!

Weekend Links is a collection of the interesting bits and pieces that I’ve come across on the streets and online. The weekly post is my chance to share with you a few things from the week, in a list compiled during the weekend. I hope you enjoy them as well.

A few things I enjoyed last week:
1. Listening to an evening of The Decemberists at Paradiso. Just the bit of Pacific NW that I needed (pictured above via)
2. Stretching my writing muscles in a weekend workshop
3. Watching La Flâneur, a time-lapse video by Luke Shepard made up of 2000 photos of Paris
4. Reading the article The power of lonely (via something changed)
5. Reading The Elements of Content Strategy from A Book Apart. Nerdy work stuff that I can’t wait to dive into
6. Receiving a note from a friend that reminded me of the importance of public broadcasting. To support NPR and PBS, sign this petition
7. Viewing amazing productions during a new multimedia contest (Blanco by Stefano De Luigi pictured below)

A Taste of Hint Fiction

Inspired by the NPR broadcast ‘Hint Fiction Celebrates the (Extremely) Short Story’, my father challenged my family to a competition over the holidays. The genre hint fiction is defined by a story of 25 words or less, which stimulates the imagination through its brevity. Take Ernest Hemingway’s six-word story for example. “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” In the end, five of us participated, anonymously presented our stories, and voted on the favorites.

I imagined a scene taking place on the roads through the mountain pass between the Willamette Valley and the Cascade Mountain Range. Marcus’ story described his morning view on an Amsterdam weekday. My father wrote a mystical tale about time past. My mother wrote about her favorite summer activity, water skiing. My brother found inspiration in murder mystery tales. Below, the stories:

My story:
The mountain pass
She turned onto the all but abandoned logging road,
the entrance graced with a worn-down cross staked into the earth.
Her fingers drummed to the beat of the music, turned just a little louder.

Marcus’ winning story:
9:12 am
Dense fog covering the river makes it difficult to see over to the other side.
The start of the week.

My mother’s entry:
An Afternoon of Surface Tension
Strong breeze creates a tangled mane
Nostrils filled with sunshine
Cool mists in rhythmic sprays
Mechanical roar
That quiets the smiling soul.

My father’s entry:
Ringing
Below lake waters,
Tossed long ago
Lay ring shining.
Fish fin by, sunlight reflects back
To her hand empty unhealed
It’s giver lay below earthen cover of European war.

My brother’s entry:
Christmas Cheer
Walks on the beach and candlelight dinners and the ad read, but the light kicking in her stomach made her body shake with rage as her fingers tightened around the pistol.

Farewell, Salinger

Signatures Exchanged for Passwords

The project Signatures Exchanged for Passwords by Donna Rumble-Smith takes a nostalgic look at the waning use of handwriting in the digital age and the loss of intimacy and emotion that accompanies the use of digital text over the handwritten word. Her project was showcased at Talent 2009 in Eindhoven and featured on design.nl.

Language in Flux

“Not until the 17th century did people begin thinking that the language needed to be codified, and the details of who would do that and how have yet to be resolved. Should it be accomplished through a government-sponsored academy, an officially sanctioned dictionary, or what? These and other means were attempted, but meanwhile ordinary folks, dang them, kept right on talking and writing however they wanted, inventing words, using contractions and so on.”

NY Times article reviewing ‘The Lexicographer’s Dilemma‘ by Jack Lynch

A Woman’s Wit

“If you said you were going off for the weekend and you were doing nothing except re-reading Emma or taking Mansfield Park to bed, that image for me would be one of pure happiness. I mean, you could bring maybe a person to bed, and that might be nicer in some way, but it wouldn’t be as fully satisfying.”
— Colm Toíbín

Authors, scholars, and philosophers discuss the writing of Jane Austen in conversation around the exhibition A Woman’s Wit: Jane Austen’s Life and Legacy at The Morgan Library and Museum in New York. A video to watch for those who love the work of Austen, and for those who don’t yet know they do. (via karigee)